Are Japan’s top brands reluctant to join Tokyo’s military?

https://sputniknews.com/20230316/are-japans-best-known-brands-reluctant-to-join-tokyos-military-buildup–1108443073.html

Are Japan’s top brands reluctant to join Tokyo’s military?

Are Japan’s top brands reluctant to join Tokyo’s military?

Late last year, Japan unveiled its largest military buildup since World War II, with a defense budget of $320 billion over the next five years.

2023-03-16T06:01+0000

2023-03-16T06:01+0000

2023-03-16T06:01+0000

Asia

Japan

mitsubishi heavy industry

mitsubishi electric

toshiba inc

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subaru

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The Japanese government is trying hard to convince some of the country’s famous brands to increase their military production, British media reported, citing unnamed sources. The companies include Toshiba Corp, Daikin Industries Ltd, Subaru, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Mitsubishi Electric, which has “quietly armed” Japan’s Self-Defense Forces (SDF) for decades. As an example, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ military contracts account for only a tenth of its 2022 revenue of $29 billion. The company mainly focuses on civilian production. aircraft components, power plant equipment and factory machinery. One insider said Japan’s top brands were particularly concerned about the potential damage to their public image from arms sales, a message they have echoed in previous meetings with the country’s defense ministry. Officials. The remarks came after Tokyo approved its largest military build-up since World War II, warning that China posed Tokyo’s “greatest strategic challenge ever” and citing an additional regional security threat allegedly emanating from North Korea. : It’s Japan’s new national security strategy, which aims to double the country’s defense spending to two percent of gross domestic product by 2027. Deviating from the post-war commitment to keep spending at 1% of GDP. Japan will increase its 2023 defense budget to a record 6.8 trillion yen ($55 billion), or 20 percent, while the country’s military spending for 5. the year starting in April will be a whopping ¥43 trillion ($315 billion).

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Japan’s military record accumulation, Japan’s most famous brands, Tokyo’s new national security strategy

Japan’s military record accumulation, Japan’s most famous brands, Tokyo’s new national security strategy

Late last year, Japan unveiled its largest military buildup since World War II, with a defense budget of $320 billion over the next five years.

The Japanese government is working hard to convince some of the country’s top brands to increase their military production, a British media outlet said, citing unnamed sources.

Toshiba Corp, Daikin Industries Ltd, Subaru, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Mitsubishi Electric are among the companies that have reportedly “quietly armed” Japan’s Self-Defense Forces (SDF) for decades.

As an example, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ military contracts are only a tenth of that 29 billion dollars The company mainly focuses on manufacturing civil aircraft components, power plant equipment and factory machinery.

Sources claim that the surge in defense output in a “country with entrenched anti-militarism public sentiment” is “proving a tough sell for some of its suppliers”.

One insider said Japan’s top brands were particularly worried about the potential damage to their public image from arms sales, a message they echoed in previous meetings with the country’s defense ministry officials.

The British media quoted an unnamed official at a “major Japanese defense supplier” as saying the “reputational risk” was “very concerning”. The official added that “there have been cases when our Chinese clients have expressed their concern when the topic of defense has come up.”

The remarks came after Tokyo approved its largest military build-up since World War II, warning that China is Tokyo’s “greatest strategic challenge ever” and citing an additional regional security threat allegedly posed by North Korea.
Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida attends a press conference in Tokyo on December 16, 2022 - Sputnik International, 1920, 23.01.2023

Japan will remain a peaceful country despite increasing military spending. Prime Minister

The build-up is Japan’s new national security strategy, which aims to double the country’s defense spending to two percent of GDP by 2027, in defiance of a postwar commitment to keep spending at 1% of GDP.

Japan will raise its defense budget to a record in 2023 6.8 trillion yen ($55 billion)or a 20 percent increase, while the country’s military spending in the five-year period beginning in April will be huge 43 trillion yen ($315 billion).



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